Tobacco Effects Your Health

How bad is tobacco for my health? Tobacco Effects Your Health

Tobacco Effects Your Health

Tobacco effects your health enormously. Quitting smoking is the single best thing you can do for your health.  Tobacco avoidance is the most preventable cause of death in the United States.  Cigarettes account for approximately 1/3 of all cancer deaths in America each year.  Tobacco not only causes cancer, it also adversely affects your heart, lungs, blood vessels and many other areas of your body.  Consider the following statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Tobacco Effects on Health Tobacco Effects on Health

  • Smokers are 2 to 4 times more likely to develop heart disease than nonsmokers.
  • Smoking doubles a person’s risk for a stroke. Tobacco Effects on Health
  • Smoking causes a 10-fold increase in the risk of dying from chronic obstructive lung disease.  About 90% of all deaths from chronic obstructive lung diseases are due to cigarette smoking. Tobacco Effects on Health
  • There are more than 4,000 chemicals in cigarette smoke, 250 of which are highly toxic and some of which cause cancer.  Some of these chemicals are also found in wood varnish, the insect poison “DDT”, arsenic, nail polish remover and rat poison.
  • The risk of dying from lung cancer is more than 22 times higher among men who smoke and about 12 times higher among women who smoke compared with never smokers.
  • Smoking increases the risk for many types of cancer, including cancers of the lip, mouth, pharynx, esophagus, pancreas, voice box, lung, uterus, bladder and kidney.
  • Rates of cancers related to smoking vary widely among members of racial/ethnic groups, but are highest among African-American men.

What is in cigarettes? Tobacco Effects on Health

There are more than 4,000 chemicals in cigarette smoke, 250 of which are highly toxic and some of which cause cancer.  Some of these chemicals are also found in wood varnish, the insect poison “DDT”, arsenic, nail polish remover and rat poison.

Is chewing or dipping tobacco safer than cigarette smoking?

No.  Chewing or dipping tobacco (also called smokeless tobacco use) are major health hazards.  It has long been known that it increases your risk of oral cancer and tooth and gum disease.  New research shows that the risk of using smokeless tobacco goes well beyond the mouth.  It can cause high cholesterol, heart disease, strokes and non-oral cancer (like pancreatic cancer).

What are the effects of quitting tobacco use? 

The benefits of quitting are immediate.  Circulation and blood pressure improve first.  Within days your sense of taste and smell improve and it becomes easier for you to breathe.  The long-term benefits are substantial.  Ten years after quitting your risk of dying from lung cancer is 30% to 50% less than the risk would have been if you had continued to smoke.  After 10 to 15 years, your risk of premature death is similar to that of someone who never smoked.  If you have already developed cancer, quitting smoking will reduce your risk of developing infections, which often lead to death. Tobacco Effects on Health

I have used tobacco for a long time.  Is it too late for me to quit?

It’s never too late to quit.  If you quit before the age of 50, you will decrease your risk of dying in the next 16 years by 50%.  Even if you are in your 50s or 60s, you can potentially add years to your life by quitting.  Tobacco Effects on Health

Tobacco Effects on Health Tobacco Effects on Health

about the author

Jeff Dailey

Jeff has been the CEO of Senior.com for 12 years.  Senior.com has grown under Jeff’s leadership, in fact when the website was first launched, the member base grew form Zero to over 700,000 in less the 3 years.  Current, has over 1,600,000 registered members.

Jeff received his MBA degree in Managerial Finance and Investor Relations from the University of Phoenix and his Bachelor of Arts degree in Corporate Finance and Accounting from California State University, Fullerton.

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