Freedom Scientific Topaz XL HD Desktop Video Magnifier - 1080p Resolution

Freedom Scientific TOPAZ XL HD-24
1 review
$4,045.00
$4,045.00 $4,899.00
You save 17% ($854.00)
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Please Note This item is currently a custom build upon ordering and will ship the 1st week of April

The ultimate desktop video magnifier, TOPAZ XL HD provides high-definition magnification with the sharpest image and the crispest text, allowing for low magnification levels that fit more text on the screen for faster reading and better comprehension with less fatigue. With its extra features and computer connectivity, TOPAZ XL HD is the video magnifier of choice for those looking for maximum productivity in work and school environments.

Features:

  • All the features of our standard TOPAZ HD and TOPAZ EZ HD models PLUS…
  • High-definition camera to provide a crisp image that is easy to read at all magnification levels
  • 1080p resolution
  • Widest field of view to fit more text on the screen at once, for greater productivity with less fatigue
  • Position Locator to pinpoint the area you see on the monitor
  • Use with GEM® and OpenBook® Scanning and Reading Software to send the image from TOPAZ XL HD to your computer to read it aloud
  • Magnification to 64 times (on a 24-inch monitor)
  • Auto-focus camera
  • Accurate colors and even illumination with no glare to minimize fatigue
  • 33 screen color modes including high-contrast full color, true-color, and grayscale to fit your viewing needs
  • Over 8 inches of working space to write and work comfortably
  • Unique can and bottle holder holds round objects steady
  • Extra-wide reading table to smoothly glide large books and objects under the camera
  • Adjustable monitor can be raised or lowered, tilted forward or back, or turned 90 degrees to the right or left
  • Freeze Frame to stop movement for close inspection of small objects or to keep your place
  • Focus Lock to maintain focus while writing
  • Find feature to quickly zoom out, find your place, and zoom back in to read
  • Reading Lines, Shades, and Masks to reduce eye fatigue and focus on what you want to read
Downloads

GEM Software

Warranty

Your product includes a three-year warranty against manufacturing defects. 

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Filter Reviews:
  • Topaz
  • MACULAR DEGENERATION
  • magnifier
A
06/09/2023
Anonymous
United States United States
I recommend this product

Great product

My advancing macular degeneration made reading very difficult until I received and began using my Topaz magnifier. I can once again enjoy my favorite pass time.

What is Macular Degeneration

Age Related Macular Degeneration is a degenerative disease of the retina that causes progressive loss of vision in the center of the eye. People describe it as having a spot or blurry space in the middle of their vision that interferes with daily tasks like reading and driving. There are two types of macular degeneration, dry and wet.

Dry Age Related Macular Degeneration results when yellow-white deposits called drusen accumulate under the macula, which is the central portion of the retina. Scientists don’t know exactly why this occurs.

In Wet Age Related Macular Degeneration, abnormal blood vessel growth forms under the macula and leaks fluid damaging photoreceptor cells. Wet Age Related Macular Degeneration can progress rapidly and cause serious damage. If it’s caught early, however, laser surgery may be able to prevent extensive vision loss.

The risk of developing macular degeneration increases with age and the disease is the most common cause of vision loss in people over the age of 55, particularly women. While it significantly reduces vision, Age Related Macular Degeneration does not cause total blindness.

If you have suffered vision loss due to Age Related Macular Degeneration your doctor will probably refer you to a low vision specialist. This dedicated eye care professional will be able to evaluate your available vision and refer you to other specialists who can assist with rehabilitation and resources.

To learn more about vision rehabilitation please read our article called: “Vision Rehabilitation is the Key”.

Most of all, realize that you are not alone. Millions of Americans experience low vision through various eye diseases, like Macular Degeneration, and there are many organizations, professionals and resources available to you. In addition to these resources there are products, like digital magnification, which allow you to maintain your independence through the vision loss process.

Source & Credit - Enhanced Vision

What is a cataract?

A cataract is a clouding of the lens in the eye that affects vision. Most cataracts are related to aging. Cataracts are very common in older people. By age 80, more than half of all Americans either have a cataract or have had cataract surgery.

A cataract can occur in either or both eyes. It cannot spread from one eye to the other.

What is the lens?

The lens is a clear part of the eye that helps to focus light, or an image, on the retina. The retina is the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye.

In a normal eye, light passes through the transparent lens to the retina. Once it reaches the retina, light is changed into nerve signals that are sent to the brain.

The lens must be clear for the retina to receive a sharp image. If the lens is cloudy from a cataract, the image you see will be blurred.

Are there other types of cataract

Yes. Although most cataracts are related to aging, there are other types of cataract:

  1. Secondary cataract. Cataracts can form after surgery for other eye problems, such as glaucoma. Cataracts also can develop in people who have other health problems, such as diabetes. Cataracts are sometimes linked to steroid use.
  2. Traumatic cataract. Cataracts can develop after an eye injury, sometimes years later.
  3. Congenital cataract. Some babies are born with cataracts or develop them in childhood, often in both eyes. These cataracts may be so small that they do not affect vision. If they do, the lenses may need to be removed.
  4. Radiation cataract. Cataracts can develop after exposure to some types of radiation.

Source & Credit - Enhanced Vision

National Eye Institute. Facts About Cataract